r6 - 2017-10-31 - 07:07:13 - PaulEllisYou are here: TWiki >  Deployment Web > DeploymentTroubleshooting > MustgatherPerformanceProblemsInCLM

Mustgather: Performance problems in CLM new.png

Authors: ChristianGlockner, PaulEllis, BenSilverman

When you are facing a performance problem with CLM that you can't resolve yourself, you can always reach out to IBM Rational Client Support for help. When you open a PMR to report a performance problem, it's vital that you provide meaningful information from the start. This mustgather document lists the information that we need from you in order to analyze and resolve your performance problem as swiftly as possible.

Problem definition

Before determining which information to collect and send to IBM support to analyze a performance problem it is important to first understand the nature of the performance problem. To allow IBM support to help you in the best way possible, please provide answers to the following questions:

  1. Which specific actions are slow?
  2. Typically performance problems do not necessarily affect a whole system but rather just a part of it. It is much easier to analyze a performance problem that is narrowed down to specific actions rather than one reported too vaguely (“the system is slow”). If you do find that indeed all actions are slow, then do state that.

  3. Which specific actions are not slow
  4. During the analysis of any problem it is useful to understand the scope of the problem, i.e. which functions of a system are affected but also which are not affected. This will help narrow down the root cause of the problem. If you find that there are no actions that are performing satisfactorily, then please state that.

  5. How slow are the specific actions that are slow?
  6. After understanding the scope of the performance problem, we'll need to understand the scale of it. This is important because it will partly determine the business impact caused by the performance problem. What matters here are specific numbers – for instance “It takes 30 seconds to open a Work Item” rather than “It takes a very long time to open a Work Item”. You may not have tools to measure performance, but a stop watch is good enough for this purpose.

  7. What performance are you expecting from those actions that are slow?
  8. Now we know how long it takes for certain actions to be carried out, we also need to understand what performance you are expecting from those actions. For instance, if performance was fine at some point in the past and it took 5 seconds to open a Work Item, then those 5 seconds might be a good number to be expecting. Otherwise if you are just beginning to use the system and have no reference performance from the past, provide us with your expectation. Again, be as specific as you can.

  9. When is the slowness observed?
  10. It is very rare that performance problems affect a system all the time. Most of the time poor performance is observed at specific times, for instance during busy periods. In order to understand the timing of the performance problem, you'll need to collect data over a period of time. Say you're facing slow performance once a day – in that case you should note the time of the occurrence (and how long it lasts) for several days before reporting the problem to us. This will be crucial because it helps us understand if there is any pattern in how and when the problem arises, which will in turn be very useful for the identification of the root cause. If performance is indeed poor all the time, then please state that.

  11. When was the slowness observed for the first time?
  12. If your system was performing satisfactorily in the past and only recently started showing poor performance it is important for us to understand when the problem started because we can work with you to determine what has changed that could lead to the degradation in performance. If you do not have any date and time that you can pinpoint, often the date and time of the first official report (for instance via a ticket) is the best information you will have and we'd be happy to have that information too.

  13. Who experiences the slowness? Who doesn't?
  14. In many organizations, users of a system or an application are globally dispersed these days, some may be working from the office while others may be working from home. Additionally users typically have varying degrees of permissions within an application. All of these may have an impact on the perceived performance of the application. It is therefore important to understand which specific users are actually experiencing the slowness, but also which specific users are not. If you find that only a subset of your users are seeing poor performance while there are others who are not, we'll work with you to determine what these users have in common and what distinguishes them from the others – but generally you can help us by letting us know any commonalities or distinctions you can think of, for instance geographic location.

  15. Is it getting slower? Is it getting faster?
  16. Depending on the nature of the performance problem you may be seeing a deterioration of performance over time, or perhaps an improvement. However, it's perfectly possible that performance remains stable at an unsatisfactory level. Either way, we'd like to understand what trend you are observing.

  17. Are you seeing high CPU usage?
  18. If you are experiencing a performance problem and observing constant high CPU usage at the same time, then most likely the high CPU usage is the cause of the performance problem. In that case the investigation will aim to identify the root cause of the high CPU usage and we need specific bits of information from you. See WhyIsMyCPUSpiking.

Environment description

Once you understand the nature of the performance problem by answering the questions above, it is time to collect environmental information:

  1. What architecture/topology are you using?
  2. For the analysis of any performance problem it is critical to understand the architecture of the system exhibiting poor performance. Since CLM supports several different deployment topologies it is important that you tell us which topology you are using. A proven way of doing that is to provide us with a diagram that details your environment, including the database server(s), the application server(s), any proxy server(s) and clients.

  3. Are you using VMware?
  4. Virtualization is so ubiquitous these days, chances are that you are using it for hosting your applications. If you are, we will need even more information which you can provide to us by answering the questions below. Note: If you are using VMware clustering or DRS please answer the questions with the totals for all hypervisors in the cluster rather than for just one hypervisor.

    1. How many sockets are installed in the hypervisor and how many cores are on each socket?
    2. Is hyperthreading enabled on the hypervisor?
    3. How much physical memory is installed on the hypervisor?
    4. How many VMs are powered on on the hypervisor?
    5. How many vCPUs are allocated in total to all powered on VMs on the hypervisor?
    6. How much memory is allocated in total to all powered on VMs on the hypervisor?
    7. What reservations (if any) are in place for vCPUs on the VM in question?
    8. What reservations (if any) are in place for memory on the VM in question?

  5. Operating system and middleware stack
  6. CLM gives you various choices for the underlying middleware. For that reason we'd like to understand whether you are using IBM WebSphere Application Server or Apache Tomcat as your application server, but also which database backend (IBM DB2, Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server) you are using. Finally we'd also like to know which operating system you are using, including bitness (32 vs 64). For all components we need to know which exact version you are using.

  7. Resource allocation and usage
  8. Whether you are using VMware or not, we need to understand how many resources are allocated to the application, the middleware and the database. It is therefore important to answer these questions:

    1. How much total memory is allocated to the machine running CLM or the database server?
    2. If you are using a deployment model where the CLM applications and the database are spread across multiple servers, please provide this information for each individual server.

    3. What are the settings concerning minimum and maximum Java Virtual Machine heap size (Xms and Xms) and nursery space (Xmn) for the application server running CLM?
    4. Again, if you have CLM deployed across multiple machines (or application servers), please provide this information for each.

    5. If you are running Linux or UNIX, please provide the output of free -m, if you are running on Windows, please provide a screenshot of Task Manager's Performance tab.

  9. Usage model
  10. In order for us to understand whether the allocated resources are sufficient, we need to have a clear understanding of your usage model. We therefore need more information (the more specific the better) on the following:

    1. How many registered users do you have in total?
    2. How many licenses do you have for all of the CLM products?
    3. How many concurrently logged in users do you see on average?
    4. What are your users doing in the applications?
    5. If possible work with your users to establish what their day-to-day activities are. Also try to determine if there is a set of activities that are only performed at certain times (e.g. end-of-quarter reporting, end-of-iteration check-ins, etc.).

    Information gathering

    In order to analyze the performance problem we need certain bits of information from you. The list below should help you collect the right information. Troubleshooting database problems by using built-in serviceability features of IBM Collaborative Lifecycle Management has just been written and provide new options since 6.0.3 for obtaining key metrics.

    1. Resource utilization
    2. We need to understand the amount of resources that are available and in use on the system in question. To get that information, we'd prefer to get a graph created using a monitoring solution of your choice, showing CPU and memory usage over the course of at least 24 hours. This will allow us to see if there are any obvious issues with resource utilization on the system.

    3. Application log files
    4. Application log files will allow us to get a better idea of what the application is doing at the time when you are observing the performance problem. It is important that the log files you send to us cover at least one (ideally more than one) instance of it.

      Note: In the paths below, JAZZ_HOME refers to the JazzTeamServer directory (typically C:\Program Files\IBM\JazzTeamServer on Windows or /opt/IBM/JazzTeamServer on Linux/UNIX).

      Additionally, WAS_HOME refers to the directory where WebSphere Application Server is installed (typically C:\Program Files\IBM\WebSphere\AppServer on Windows or /opt/IBM/WebSphere/AppServer on Linux/UNIX), PROFILE_NAME refers to the name of WebSphere Application Server profile which the CLM applications are installed in (by default AppSrv01).

      If you are using CLM with Tomcat on Windows, please send us a zip file of the following directories:

      • JAZZ_HOME\server\logs
      • JAZZ_HOME\server\tomcat\logs

      If you are using CLM with Tomcat on Linux or UNIX, please send us a zip (or tar) file of the following directories:

      • JAZZ_HOME/server/logs
      • JAZZ_HOME/server/tomcat/logs

      If you are using CLM with WebSphere Application Server on Windows, please send us a zip file of the following directory:

      • WAS_HOME\profiles\PROFILE_NAME\logs

      If you are using CLM with WebSphere Application Server on Linux or UNIX, please send us a zip (or tar) file of the following directory:

      • WAS_HOME/profiles/PROFILE_NAME/logs

    5. Javacore files / WAIT data collection
    6. By looking at javacore files, we will be able to determine which code the application was executing and what it was potentially waiting for (for instance a lock, a network resource, etc). These javacore files can be generated in a number of ways, but the preferred way is using the WAIT Data Collector.

      The WAIT Data Collector can be downloaded from https://wait.ibm.com/ (free registration required), and is specific to the operating system.

      Once you are observing the performance problem, first identify the process ID (PID) of the java process belonging to either Tomcat or WebSphere Application Server. This can be done using ps -ef | grep java on Linux or UNIX or using Task Manager on Windows (you will need to add the PID column to the display columns). In the commands below, this PID is referred to as PID.

      Then start the WAIT Data Collector and let it collect 5 javacore files, 30 seconds apart by running the appropriate command below from a DOS prompt or terminal in the directory where you extracted the WAIT Data Collector.

      Note: In the commands below, JAZZ_HOME refers to the JazzTeamServer directory (typically C:\Program Files\IBM\JazzTeamServer on Windows or /opt/IBM/JazzTeamServer on Linux/UNIX).

      Additionally, WAS_HOME refers to the directory where WebSphere Application Server is installed (typically C:\Program Files\IBM\WebSphere\AppServer on Windows or /opt/IBM/WebSphere/AppServer on Linux/UNIX), PROFILE_NAME refers to the name of WebSphere Application Server profile which the CLM applications are installed in (by default AppSrv01).

      If you are using Tomcat on Windows:

      waitDataCollector.bat PID JAZZ_HOME\server --sleep 30 --iters 5

      If you are using Tomcat on Linux or UNIX:

      ./waitDataCollector.sh --sleep 30 --iters 5 PID

      If you are using WebSphere Application Server on Windows:

      waitDataCollector.bat PID WAS_HOME\profiles\PROFILE_NAME --sleep 30 --iters 5

      If you are using WebSphere Application Server on Linux or UNIX:

      ./waitDataCollector.sh --sleep 30 --iters 5 PID

      Once data collection is finished, a zip or tar file will be generated automatically. Please send this file to us for further investigation.

    7. Verbose Garbage Collection
    8. Performance problems may be caused by excessive garbage collection of the Java Virtual Machine. To rule this in or out, we need to analyze verbose garbage collection logs. Verbose garbage collection is disabled by default and therefore needs to be enabled as follows:

      If you are using Tomcat:

      Open the file JAZZ_HOME/server/server.startup.bat (Windows) or JAZZ_HOME\server\server.startup (Linux/UNIX) in an editor and locate the following line:

      export JAVA_OPTS

      In the line before that line add the following:

      JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -verbose:gc -Xverbosegclog"

      After saving the file, restart Tomcat.

      After the restart is complete, verbose GC logs will be generated in JAZZ_HOME\server (Windows) or JAZZ_HOME/server (Linux/UNIX). The logs will be named verbosegc.YYYYMMDD.HHMMSS.PID.txt (where YYYYMMDD and HHMMSS are the date and time and PID is the process ID of the java process).

      These verbose GC logs should be provided to us for further analysis.

      Note: If you have configured Tomcat to run as a Windows Service, then the two Java Options -verbose:gc and -Xverbosegclog need to be added to the Java Options in the Tomcat Service configuration panel.

      If you are using WebSphere Application Server:

      Open the WebSphere Integrated Solutions Console, log in, and navigate to Servers > Server Types > WebSphere application server > SERVER_NAME (where SERVER_NAME is the name of the application server, by default server1). Expand “Java and Process Management” and click “Process definition”. On the following page click “Java Virtual Machine”. In the text field “Generic JVM arguments” enter the following:

      -verbose:gc -Xverbosegclog

      Click “OK”. At the top of the page click “Save”. Restart WebSphere Application Server.

      After the restart is complete, verbose GC logs will be generated in WAS_HOME\profiles\PROFILE_NAME (Windows) or WAS_HOME/profiles/PROFILE_NAME (Linux/UNIX). The logs will be named verbosegc.YYYYMMDD.HHMMSS.PID.txt (where YYYYMMDD and HHMMSS are the date and time and PID is the process ID of the java process). These verbose GC logs should be provided to us for further analysis.

      Related topics: Deployment web home, Deployment web home

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