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Partial Deliver Vs Complete Deliver on Streams.... that is the question!


Leandro Leal (14613745) | asked Dec 11 '14, 10:18 a.m.

Our security team validates the date and time of the objects that reach production, which is why developers only delivered to RTC what changed, but this is a bad practice because when a new development begins the baseline will contain only a partial delivery of the system. So if they make complete deliveries of the system how can validate the security team which object was modified?

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Geoffrey Clemm (30.1k23035) | answered Dec 15 '14, 12:57 a.m.
FORUM ADMINISTRATOR / FORUM MODERATOR / JAZZ DEVELOPER
A baseline on a stream contains all of the changes delivered to that stream, not just the most recent delivery.   So there is no such thing as a "partial delivery".

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Leandro Leal commented Dec 15 '14, 11:13 a.m. | edited Dec 17 '14, 1:35 p.m.

If we have a baseline that contains the objects in the Application X (A, B, C). And we need to make a modification to the object (A). The development team creates a baseline only with A  and removes  B and C. The changeset will be:
+A (
modified)
- B
- C

A better practice would be to give A (Modified) without removing B and C.Then in the next load can get a full version of the application. I hope to explain better.

Geoffrey Clemm commented Dec 17 '14, 1:43 p.m.
FORUM ADMINISTRATOR / FORUM MODERATOR / JAZZ DEVELOPER

Just to confirm we are talking about the same use case, are A, B, and C files/directories in a given RTC component, or are they separate RTC components?   In particular, when you say "the development team creates a baseline only with A and removes B and C", does that mean the development team deleted the files B and C, and then baselined the result?   If so, unless they really intended on deleting B and C from the system, they shouldn't be deleting them before baselining.


sam detweiler commented Dec 17 '14, 1:46 p.m.

Baseline is on EVERYTHING in a stream, a checkpoint over everything at one moment. Usually you do this because they all deliver to production at the same time, and you want a concise record.

if they are independent, and only deliver via packaging, is to use separate streams for each component, then basline them as often as needed.. then deliver them to a common stream for packaging and distribution.. then you wouldn't have the trouble with deleting a component that you didn't want included in the baseline.

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