It's all about the answers!

Ask a question

Help in setting up Java developement env for RTC 3.0.1


Karthik Krishnan (859497141) | asked Jan 25 '12, 8:45 a.m.
hello

I am looking at this article https://jazz.net/library/article/634/ for setting up the Java development environment

My goal is to write methods which can modify workitem / build results etc. I want the Java application to be running in server. IO am wondering what coul be the process for deployment. Can any one point me in the right direction

thanks

Cheers,

Karthik

5 answers



permanent link
sam detweiler (12.4k6180201) | answered Jan 25 '12, 10:15 a.m.
You need to do plugin development, and this requires the SDK..

so in your eclipse, window, preferences, plugin development, target platform, point to the sdk directory you created after unzipping the SDK download.

Sam

permanent link
Karthik Krishnan (859497141) | answered Jan 25 '12, 10:29 a.m.
You need to do plugin development, and this requires the SDK..

so in your eclipse, window, preferences, plugin development, target platform, point to the sdk directory you created after unzipping the SDK download.

Sam


Thanks sam. actually I want the java file to be executed in server and not as plugin Is this possible?

permanent link
sam detweiler (12.4k6180201) | answered Jan 25 '12, 1:02 p.m.
no.. the only way to make an RTC extension is a plugin.

if you mean 'server' as in run on the same hardware and operating system, but outside the RTC process.. then u want to be a 'client', and there u would use the Java apis.

I have code (a web service) called from an remote application (salesforce.com) which resides in the same java app server as RTC.
The two do not know about each other, and the web service implementation uses the java apis to connect to the RTC server and inject workitems and data.

I also have other code running inside the RTC process, advisors and particpants and a remoteRepository extension.. all those are plugins.

Sam

permanent link
Karthik Krishnan (859497141) | answered Jan 26 '12, 1:05 a.m.
no.. the only way to make an RTC extension is a plugin.

if you mean 'server' as in run on the same hardware and operating system, but outside the RTC process.. then u want to be a 'client', and there u would use the Java apis.

I have code (a web service) called from an remote application (salesforce.com) which resides in the same java app server as RTC.
The two do not know about each other, and the web service implementation uses the java apis to connect to the RTC server and inject workitems and data.

I also have other code running inside the RTC process, advisors and particpants and a remoteRepository extension.. all those are plugins.

Sam

Thanks Sam

Perhaps I wasn't clear. I want to write Java apps for routine maintenance of RTC. Hence this needs to run on server. I do not want to write any plugins at this moment. So what all I should take care in order to deploy the java application in the server?

permanent link
sam detweiler (12.4k6180201) | answered Jan 26 '12, 9:32 a.m.
so, you are writing client applications which may or may not give u the capabilities u want..

so you are using the Java client api. and u would have to deploy whatever jar files u needed to support your applications function. In my web service application there are 20 com.ibm.team.... or org.eclipse.... jar files in the 60 jar files packaged to support my applications functions.

this app creates and updates workitems.

like all applications you will have to package the dependent files to be deployed somewhere, update the classpath of the application definition, and launch the app somehow. how and what that is depends on what u are trying to do.. mine is an app inside a java app server, I also have smaller test apps that use less jar files.. I wrote batch scripts to do all the setup work.

they can be launched by cron jobs, or manually..

If you are looking for a document that says , for these rtc functions, u need these jar files.. then you are out of luck.. that doc does not exist.

Sam

Your answer


Register or to post your answer.