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Academic use and research projects

Rational Team Concert and other Jazz products are available FREE of charge for qualified academic institutions and research projects. The roadmap below will help get you started. If you have any questions, contact us at info@jazz.net.

Path 1: Use JazzHub

JazzHub allows you to develop and collaborate on software projects in the cloud. Get the benefits of Jazz technology without installing or configuring your own server.

Path 2: Download and install Rational Team Concert on your own server

This path is for those who might not qualify to use the JazzHub or who are looking for more control over their environment and access control.

1
Download Rational Team Concert

Download a free 60-day trial of Rational Team Concert.

Want to learn more?

Learn more about how to get the most out of Rational Team Concert.

Download Rational Team Concert

2
Register for a License

  1. Get a Universal IBM ID.
  2. Register to become a member of the Academic Initiative.
  3. Register for access to the License Key Center. On the Support tab, click Rational Key Request Form.

After you are registered with the Academic Initiative, you will be able to get a license for Rational Team Concert.

3
Get your License Activation Kit

  1. Log in at the Rational License Key Center.
  2. Click IBM Rational Team Concert under Product Line.
  3. Click IBM Rational Team Concert Enterprise Edition Server Activation Kit.
  4. Select your license key, and follow the steps to download the keys.
  5. Install your license to activate your trial version of Rational Team Concert. Learn how or watch a video.

Research Projects and Classroom Usage

Below are some of the cool research projects and academic projects that we've heard about.

IBM is a strong supporter of Jazz research. In fact, the Jazz initiative began as a collaboration between Rational and IBM Research. IBM supports specific research projects with the Jazz Innovation Awards.

AP Jazz - Integrating synchronous distributed project planning with executable acceptance test driven development for agile software teams - University of Calgary
Frank Maurer (PI), Shelly Park, Xin Wang

Agile methods are moving into the mainstream of software development at the same time as the software industry sees more and more globally distributed teams. Agile teams follow an iterative, incremental and test-driven development approach. Short iterations make it impractical for distributed agile teams to gather in the same room for project planning meetings. As a result, synchronous planning meetings are being conducted with team members in different locations using telecommunication and sometimes (web-based) agile planning tools for creating a shared workspace displaying plan information. The goal this Jazz-supported project is twofold:

  • to link our synchronous AgilePlanner tool with the Jazz Teamserver and
  • to integrate acceptance test driven development with agile project management to support feature-oriented progress tracking

Bluegrass - A Virtual World for Collaborative Software Development in Jazz - IBM Research, Cambridge
Li-Te Cheng, John Patterson and Steve Rohall, Collaborative User Experience Group

Bluegrass is a Jazz plugin that provides a virtual world where developers can meet online, discuss their work, collaboratively create designs for their projects. Elements of the world include visualizations, meeting rooms, and persisted virtual design documents linked to Jazz artifacts.


Connecting developers across projects - University of Calgary
Thomas Zimmermann (contact) and David Schuler

Kode1061 is a Jazz plugin that provides a social networking platform for software development. The profiles recorded by Kode1061 help to locate experts, measure the impact of APIs, and assess the structure of teams. The main focus of Kode1061 is to provide all this information across project borders in order to connect developers all over the world: Ellen in Halifax can find out that Sarah in Sydney, Australia, has the required expertise to solve her urgent problem.


Enhancing Jazz Collaboration Platform through integration of Congruence Metrics: Carnegie Mellon University
Anita Sarma and Jim Herbsleb

Software development is a collaborative effort that requires close coordination among different stake holders (e.g., developers, managers, testers, clients). However, past studies have shown that a vast majority of developers do not communicate congruently, i.e., their communication networks do not match the pattern of dependencies in their tasks. This mismatch can then increase development time and seems likely to increase software errors and to reduce efficiency. To help reduce the gaps between the coordination requirements and current coordination patters, our project consists of two steps: First, it involves the computation of coordination requirements – who must coordinate with whom in order to accomplish particular development tasks – from project artifacts. Second, it investigates different visualization mechanisms to present coordination requirements to developers and managers to create an awareness of coordination needs and provide them the ability to monitor the degree of congruence between coordination needs and actual communication.

For more information contact Jim Herbsleb.


Emergent Teams - University of British Columbia
Shawn Minto and Gail Murphy

The organization of software developers into teams is increasingly dynamic. Teams often form on an as-needed basis to solve particular problems. To help software developers collaborate within a dynamic team environment, we have introduced the Emergent Expertise Locator (EEL) tool. Based on how files have changed in the past and who has participated in these changes, EEL recommends members of an emergent team for a current problem of interest. EEL has been built to work within the IBM Jazz client. EEL adds a context menu entry for a file accessed within the Jazz client that suggests relevant developers who may be able to provide expertise for that file.


JAZZing for Help and Review - Brown University
Steven P. Reiss

We plan to investigate the use of Jazz in a supervisory context. One of the major problems we have in our courses is providing help to the students with their assignments and projects. The courses use undergraduate teaching assistants (UTAs), with one UTA for every 6-10 students. One or more UTAs are available every evening to answer questions and generally provide assistance to the students. Unfortunately, the UTAs are in one room in the CS department, while the students are working in labs, in their dorms, or in computer clusters spread over the whole campus.

Additionally the UTAs are responsible for reviewing and grading student assignments, work that is often done using student presentations and demonstrations. Our research focus is going to be on using Jazz to support the UTAs in all of these activities.

For more information contact spr (at) cs (dot) brown (dot) edu


Mining Jazz Data to Assess Development Processes - Saarland University
Andreas Zeller, Tobias Scheffer, Kim Herzig

What is it that makes a good development process? We want to develop a plug-in for the the Jazz collaboration platform that learns from collaboration and defect data as tracked by Jazz, relates features of the collaborative development process to the defect density of individual components, and thereby automatically predicts code quality.


Side-by-Side Project Awareness - Exploring Multi-Monitor Environments - University of California, Irvine
Marcelo Alvim, André van der Hoek, Roger Ripley, Anita Sarma, Isabella Almeida da Silva

To date, software engineering tools have been designed under the assumption that they must effectively operate on a single monitor on a developer's desk. The trend, however, is to equip developer's desks with multiple, typically larger monitors. In addition, we find community areas being equipped with tiled displays through which vast amounts of information can be shared. This research leverages Jazz to explore how software development tools should be (re)designed to take advantage of this extra display space, with a particular focus on project awareness.


Structured Collaboration by CoFFEE in Jazz
Vittorio Scarano, Ilaria Manno, Furio Belgiorno, Giuseppina Palmieri

Our project aims at integrating CoFFEE tools into Jazz so that the Jazz Team is enriched with a set of structured collaboration tools. CoFFEE is a suite of applications designed to support cooperative learning in a face-2-face setting; it was realized during a 3-year European Union funded project called Lead. The usage scenario mixes face-2-face communication and computer-mediated communication, where the latter occurs in a shared digital workspace, provided by CoFFEE, that can be accessed by all the learners simultaneously. The main CoFFEE tools are the Threaded Discussion Tool and the Graphical Discussion Tool. The Threaded Discussion Tool provides a space for synchronous debates structured in trees and categories (a tree for each category). The Graphical Discussion Tool provides a space for synchronous communication organized as a graph, with text box and links. The objectives of our project are to integrate the Threaded Discussion Tool and Graphical Discussion Tool aims to support structured collaboration and to enhance cooperation within the team.


Supporting Pair Programming and Virtualization of the Jazz Development Environment - NC State University
Laurie Williams and Michael Devetsikiotis

Educators are challenged to employ pedagogical techniques that appeal to the values and learning styles of Millennial students and, in the process, to create an educational environment that is more representative industry's distributed, virtual, and collaborative environment. A focus of the research will be on enhancing the Jazz environment to include distributed pair programming between members of a team and instructing students to be part of a collaborative, distributed team within this environment.


Team Awareness and Coordination Mechanisms - University of Victoria
Daniela Damian, Irwin Kwan, Thanh Nguyen, Lucas Panjer

Determining what your team members are working on and keeping tabs on their involvement, expertise, and inter-issue dependencies is a constant challenge in software engineering. Team awareness and coordination is further tested as complexity and geographic distribution increase. We are developing theories and tools to address team awareness and coordination problems in the context of complex and distributed software engineering. Our tools are based on theories of coordination and feature management which we are developing through research and actual experiences of industrial software teams. Based on these theories, we are developing two concepts in prototype form using Jazz as a platform. These tools attempt to overcome the task-centric approach of managing awareness by exploiting social relationships and artifact relationships to create issue and team visualizations and awareness tools that promote effective coordination.


Traceability Visualization in Global Software Development - Carnegie Mellon University
Abhishek Minde, Bhanu Sistla, Jeff Salk, Nan Li, Yuki Saito

The goal of the project was to develop a system that could learn implicit relationships between different data elements, and visualize these relationships in different contexts so that users could make useful analyses. The project team designed and developed a framework for abstracting data stored in the Jazz platform. On top of this abstraction, they developed a mechanism to establish relationships between abstracted elements. Based on the definitions of abstracted elements and relationships between them, the tool fetches concrete data items from the Jazz platform and generates different visualizations and analytical reports. The visualization includes different graphs and tables.


Jazz In The Classroom

800 Students using RTC in Italy
Brian Schimpf

During 2010 a group of faculty members at seven universities in Italy cooperated to provide a series of shared software development experiences for their students. The project was known by the acronym ETC: Enforcing Team Cooperation. An explicit goal for these projects was to give the students experience using modern technologies, including high quality tools, for the design, development and testing of software systems. These projects were intentional about having distributed teams between institutions and were structured to require a high degree of collaboration, made possible by the tools. The faculty chose the IBM Rational Jazz tools including Rational Team Concert, Rational Quality Manager and Rational Requirements Composer, along with Rational Software Architect and Rational Functional Tester. By November of 2010 the ETC effort included eleven separate projects with a total of over 800 participants. The universities are: Federico II - Napoli, Milano Bicoccca, Bologna, Bergamo, Genova-Savona, Bari-Taranto and Salerno. The project received active support and guidance from several IBM employees in Italy.


University of British Columbia
David Shepherd

"I used IBM’s Jazz to coordinate my introductory software engineering course at the University of British Columbia.  The class had approximately 80 students and twenty groups.  I have posted a few entries to share my experience."

-David Shepherd


Brown University - JAZZing for Help and Review
Steven P. Reiss

We plan to investigate the use of Jazz in a supervisory context. One of the major problems we have in our courses is providing help to the students with their assignments and projects. The courses use undergraduate teaching assistants (UTAs), with one UTA for every 6-10 students. One or more UTAs are available every evening to answer questions and generally provide assistance to the students. Unfortunately, the UTAs are in one room in the CS department, while the students are working in labs, in their dorms, or in computer clusters spread over the whole campus.

Additionally the UTAs are responsible for reviewing and grading student assignments, work that is often done using student presentations and demonstrations. Our research focus is going to be on using Jazz to support the UTAs in all of these activities.

For more information contact spr (at) cs (dot) brown (dot) edu


For more information about Jazz research and educational programs, or to have a research project listed on this page, contact info@jazz.net.